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Alheimer"s Disease is Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer's disease is being consistently referred to as type 3 diabetes. While the causes of Alzheimer's disease may be multifactorial, 80% of Alzheimer's patients have type 2 diabetes.


Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes—Evidence Reviewed
Suzanne M. de la Monte, M.D., M.P.H. and Jack R. Wands, M.D.
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2008
© Diabetes Technology Society

Alzheimer's disease is being consistently referred to as type 3 diabetes. While the causes of Alzheimer's disease may be multifactorial, 80% of Alzheimer's patients have type 2 diabetes. Not everyone with type 2 diabetes will develop Alzheimer's disease and not everyone with Alzheimer's disease has type 2 diabetes. It was originally thought that the brain could only utilize glucose as a fuel. Later evidence has shown this not to be the case. The brain cells are quite capable of utilizing ketones for fuel. In fact, ketones may be the preferred fuel.

Further, it was originally thought that certain cells in specific areas of the brain of Alzheimer's patients were ether dead or dying. This has shown not to be the case. One of the main factors concerning the affected brain cells in Alzheimer's patients is the ability to use glucose as a fuel is severely impaired. However, the affected cells have no problem using ketones as a fuel source. The ability to utilize glucose doesn't occur at the initiation of diagnoses, but likely much sooner, even sooner than the onset of mild cognitive impairment.


Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes—Evidence Reviewed
Suzanne M. de la Monte, M.D., M.P.H. and Jack R. Wands, M.D.
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2008
© Diabetes Technology Society


The following images show a brain scan of three different subjects. The yellow / orange areas show fuel utilization. The top images show a control subject's brain using either glucose or ketones as fuel. The images show a subject with mild cognitive impairment using either glucose or ketones for fuel. The bottom images demonstrate an Alzheimer's brain utilizing either glucose or ketones.


ah_glucose_vs_ketones


Croteau, E., et al.
A cross-sectional comparison of brain glucose and ketone metabolism in cognitively healthy older adults, mild cognitive impairment.
Exp. Gerontol. (2017)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2017.07.004


It is important to note that the active cells utilizing ketones in the Alzheimer's brain are the usual affected areas. There is much more to communicate on this subject. So, watch this space for more.


Ryan



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